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Erin's First Steelhead

Joel La Follette - Thursday, November 23, 2017

Our Fly Czar, Josh Linn, rounded up the fishing report for this edition and considering he did the whole thing on his phone with text messages, it was rather wordy. So after considerable editing out of his Thanksgiving menu, Christmas wish list and observations on Nick's feeding habits, I give you the highlights complete with emojis.

 

Erin Perkin landed her first steelhead this week, which is surprising to all of us because she has hooked many Chinook. I asked her to give me all of the details and she basically texted “Hard take and immediate acrobatics. It was all around awesomeness. She was a beaut 🐟🐟 "

I’m pretty sure her smile sums it up pretty well. So that was a high.

I got another text message at dinner from a couple buddies and they had every floaters worst nightmare come true. They had fished all day and when they got to the boat launch, no truck. Whenever you drift a river in the back of your mind there’s always this little voice wondering if your rig is going to be at the takeout. I always thought the JD, the Upper Klickitat, or the Grand Ronde would be the worst places for that to happen. Well, it hasn't happen to me yet, but it didn’t happen to those two.

I got separate text messages from the two of them. The first two were from Dave. “They forgot our shuttle ⚡. We are hiking out." Then.. "They are sending someone. Serious ♥... Brutal. It’s a long hike out of the canyon to get cell service."

The next morning I got a message from Jim. “It was a crazy adventure. I always thought that would be the worst place for that to happen. The worst was that my waders started leaking first thing in the morning so I was cold as %$&#*. The walking helped.”

The boys did make it out and finally got home 8 hours later. I had made plans to float with them the next day, but that plan was 86’d because they needed their beauty sleep.

Since I’m done fishing the east side until next year my thoughts and sights are turned towards winter steelhead. My normal rule is that when the rivers are up and have been up for about three weeks there will be winter fish in the system. Well the rivers have been up and the gauge looks good. It had been raining so things weren’t going to change much.

When I got up Monday morning I checked the gauge as per usual and of course the river is climbing straight up. Mother Nature is fickle. The thing is the river can be rising and still be clear or it could be about to peak. Well, the whole drive was ominous and it poured down rain the whole way. I’m guessing you can figure out by now what happened. Yep, blown. Well, at least it’ll be a nice day for a float..... I guess I jumped the gun on this one.



I'll see you at the Black Friday Fish-A-Long!

Fishing with Worms

Joel La Follette - Thursday, November 09, 2017

By Josh Linn

Photos by Corey Koff, Nick Wheeler and Josh Linn



While Joel has been on a three day trip to the John Day with Marty and Brian, Nick and I have been out causing trouble and chasing steelhead. As Nick and I are reporting back on our fishing adventures for the week, I ponder what lessons might have been learned or any insights gained. I ask him if he has gleaned any little nuggets or had some tidbit for me. He tells me sadly, “The early bird doesn’t always get the worm.” 




We were on separate outings, but on Sunday morning I saw Nick, along with Rob and Erin Perkin at the boat launch. We had a quick talk and I told Nick I had heard there were some people camping where he wanted to fish. Apparently, he didn’t believe me because he hiked straight out to the spot. It's always better to see for yourself, and he was sorely surprised when he saw that there actually was a boat camped in there. He was sure that because there weren’t any cars in the parking lot that he was going to have his pick of spots. In a daze Nick came up with a new plan. They moved on to his second choice of runs and again, there were anglers in that piece of water. It was a little confusing considering there wasn’t a single car in the parking lot. By the end of the day they had found some good water and Nick and his companions did end up landing a couple of fish. Really his nugget was; "Be flexible and always have a backup plan or expect the unexpected.... 



I came back with a different lesson in mind. I floated on both of my days off. It was cold and and awesome! I love the fall I like the crisp cold days. The beauty of the hills with their fall colors reds, greens, and yellows is breath taking. The weather had changed as promised. There was snow a little further to the NE and it was raining extremely hard to the West. We were in a little pocket that was cold and cloudy between the two fronts. Daylight savings had moved our start time up an hour earlier, to a 4:30 a.m. wake up call. We were on the water shortly after sunrise, and ready to fish. Our last couple of outings had been really good and we had high expectations. Immediately upon stepping into the water we could feel that the water temperatures had dropped. We could feel the chilly water through our waders. I was dressed how I would typically dress for winter steelheading but you tend to forget that the fall has its own unique cold. Its dry and cold with icy biting winds. In the winter it’s typically rainy so it’s almost always in the 40’s. I’m longing for that weather and it’s coming soon enough.


We fished a ton of prime water on our float. Runs that we have caught fish in in the past, but this time it seemed like no one was home. Had the fish pushed through? Was it so cold that they were deeper in the tanky water? Or were they just glued to the bottom unwilling to eat? Without being able to communicate with the fish it’s hard to know exactly what was going on. What I do know was that we weren’t moving any fish. 

We weren’t losing hope and we were still fishing hard. We got to our last run of the day. It was getting late and had about 45 minutes to an hour left of fishing. This was quite possibly the best run on the river, this thing is a Mecca for steelhead. Eric steps in first and starts more towards the middle of the run. After a few casts I see Eric has hung up on the bottom. I toss out a sarcastic, yet comical remark, and he gets his fly free and is back to fishing. About two casts later I glance down just in time to see his rod start to bounce from the pull of a steelhead and then go limp. Sometimes you get a strong pull and it doesn’t connect. He makes a few more casts from the same station before moving and about 5 steps down to where he gets another good grab. Again I see the rod buck from the hard grab and the fish pulls a little line and then slack. Eric is dumbfounded. He strips in his fly and finds that his hook had broken off when he was hung on the bottom. He ties on a new fly and gets back to fishing. He makes it all the way to the end of the pool and literally on his last cast I look down to see where he’s at and I hear him saying, "Eat it, eat it, eat it," and after the third eat it he drives the hook home. The fish comes flying out of the water. Redemption! That was a sight to see. 




Typically when I’m fishing or guiding I am always resolute in checking my leader for wind knots if I make a bad cast or to check my hook if I hang up on the bottom. Eric had made a quick visual survey to see that he still had the fly but didn’t check the hook and that’s what I probably would have done too. So my lesson or though is don’t get complacent with your tackle. Inspect. Inspect. Inspect. If you have something happen, a bad cast, or tick the bottom, or something else check your gear to make sure it’s all in perfect working order.

Nick and I have been finding fish lately, and all of them have come on the same basic tackle setup. We have both been using lighter rods, I don’t really think it matters too much as long as you can cast it and fight a fish quickly with it. Seemingly the key to our success has been a 2.5’ Floating x7.5’ sinking t-11 MOW tip and a fly that is about 1-1.5” long. We have been fishing mostly Klamath intruders. This sink tip seems to get this smaller lighter fly down to the right depth and still swing into the soft water where fish seem to be holding.



As far as other fish reports go I haven’t heard back from a lot of people, so I don’t have a lot to report, but here is what I’ve heard.

I got a report via Satellite from Joel on the upper John Day. It’s been pretty cold, but his group has gotten into a few fish. Fish were taken on Purple Muddlers, Silveynators and Klamath Intruders.

Rob and the Water Time Outfitters gang are on their last camp trip of the season and they are still hitting good numbers of fish between Warm Springs and Maupin.

I talked with Jake from G Loomis. They were on the Deschutes and ran up from the mouth in a jet boat and they did quite well.

Seems like the Deschutes really got a late start but is fishing good right now. The secret is to cover as much water as possible.

A couple of different friends of ours were out on the Klickitat and they both said it was extremely cold and sadly no fish.

If you are planning on heading east prepare for cold weather and the possibility of snow.


It's Going to Get Chilly

Joel La Follette - Thursday, November 02, 2017

Once again I'm relinquishing the pen to Josh Linn for this weeks fishing report. Since joining our family, Josh has proven he can pick up the slack when I'm faced with other distractions. Like prepping for a 3 day drift trip on the John Day River. While I figure out how to avoid frostbite next week, I'll leave it to Josh to help you make your angling plans...

Fishing report, how about a fishing forecast? This weekend the time changes and so does the weather. Rain is in the forecast and possibly snow on the valley floor east of the Cascades. It could get very interesting for our fearless leader and his party.

A long long time ago, on one of the first adventures I made out to the Grande Ronde for a multi day steelhead trip we had one of those epic cold snaps. Ever since then I’ve gone out of my way to be overly prepared. I had guided out there for a few seasons and couldn’t wait to get out there and do a float on my own. We had been planning this trip for a couple of months and were scheduled to leave the day after Halloween. We launched early, the skies were crystal clear and the air temps were cold. It continued to get colder and the river started to freeze. The water had turned slushy and by the end of the trip the river had frozen over. Well, suffice it to say the fishing was not very good. We did end up catching a few fish, but in the end it isn’t the fishing that I’ll remember about that trip. The hardships make the adventure. It’s called type three fun.

That’s not the only cold trip I’ve been on and I’m sure it won’t be the last. If you fish in the fall you’re pretty much guaranteed to run into that kind of weather sooner or later. Now, it’s not gonna be that cold this week, but it is going to be cold enough and that makes for some great fall fishing.

I’m going to pack my cold weather gear when I head east this weekend. Zero degree sleeping bag, wool blankets, Simms down stream jacket, and of course my bootfoot waders.

So where am I gonna go? So many choices and only so many days. I’m going east to chase steelhead. I know that all the places I usually fish have been fishing good. There are steelhead spread throughout the Columbia river and its tributaries. Rob and the Water Time Outfitters gang have been doing well in the stretch from Warm Springs to Maupin and the Mack’s Canyon area and below is still producing fish.

The Klickitat is still going strong and is open till the end of the November. Fish are spread throughout the river, I would expect to do better higher up in the system.

Marty, Brian, and Corey have been on the Grande Ronde and doing well. I’m sure with that last rain there are fish everywhere in that system. If you want to venture even further the Snake and the Clearwater have been fishing great. So, where am I going to go? Well, I can’t give away all of my secrets.

My forecast is for cold weather, good fishing and the end of daylight savings. I’ll wait to hear your fishing report when you stop in next week.


Floodwaters Receding

Joel La Follette - Thursday, October 26, 2017

My Trout Bum Road Trip turned into four days of photographing animals sprinkled with a few hours of chasing Trout. Yellowstone National Park is a wondrous place in the late season before the snow falls closing it for the winter to wheeled vehicles. The tourists are gone, the animals are everywhere and the rivers are uncrowded. Having no real plans I ended up staying a few extra days in the Park and explored places I hadn't seen before.

I was able to fish the Lamar, Gibbon, Firehole and Madison rivers while dodging snow storms and hurricane winds during my visit. Brown Trout seemed the most willing to grab my streamer selection, while Rainbows preferred my go-to Silvey's Super Sinker. A Sunday morning blizzard finally chased me to the west and home.

Meanwhile here in Oregon, Trouters are lamenting the passing of the general Trout season this coming weekend, but there are still plenty of target rich environs to explore all across the state. Our popular east side streams host the dedicated all winter long so there is no need to sell off the tackle bag just yet. Layer up and get after it. What are you, a mouse?

Speaking of "mouses," my friend and fellow fly shop owner, Jeff Perin, is waging a battle royal with the mouse population around the old homestead in Sisters. I'm hoping that he can break away from the frontlines for a little angling on our favorite spring creek this weekend. Reports from that local have been favorable and demand further investigation. Besides, the dude owes me a burger and shake.

Just up the road, the Deschutes has been blessing anglers with a mix of migratory and resident Rainbows willing to play according to our Fly Czar. Since he covered the fishing report last week and did such an awesome job I've asked him to fill in the blanks for me again this week. Take it away Josh!



Not sure if you guys looked outside or saw the weather this past weekend, but it rained a lot. Like flood level rains. I’m guessing the only way you missed it is if you were in another state, like Montana or Wyoming... 

High water and big rain storms are to be expected this time of year and sadly it takes a little longer for rivers to clear. The ground is super dry, the roads have lots of dirt on them and everything washes into the rivers. Not to mention all the leaves that are falling off of the trees non stop. When the rivers finally drop and clear the fishing will be good!

I’m already planning my next couple of days of fishing and counting down the days till winter fishing starts. I’m thinking the Klickitat would be a good choice or maybe the Deschutes. Both will have lots of Steelhead and should fish good this weekend.

In anticipation of winter fishing I’ve already put my floating lines away, dusted off my skagit lines and sink tips and I’m looking for my boxes of big flies. It’s no secret that I love fishing sink tips and every day I’m thinking about fishing bigger tips and bigger flies. Right now I’m reaching for MOW tips like the medium 5x5 and the 2.5x7.5 sink. Those tips produce really well on those east side rivers like the Klickitat, Deschutes, and Grand Ronde. The flies I’m choosing are 1.5”-2.5” long, typically Black or Red. I like little rabbit tube flies like the Silveynator or mini Klamath Intruders. When I’m fishing these flies I’m typically casting them to the far bank if it’s a smaller river and letting them hang in the deeper water till the current pulls them out. A lot of the time you get the takes when the fly starts to rise up and pull into the current. Don’t be afraid to fish deep into the run where it transitions from the fishy water to the deeper un-fishable tanky stuff. As it gets colder the fish will be holding deeper and deeper.

As I sit here I’m looking at the river gauges thinking about where I should go fish. Deschutes? Klickitat? What will it be? All the rivers are quickly dropping into shape. The Deschutes at Warm Springs is almost back to normal flows. The Deschutes below White River is still pretty big. The Klickitat is up and slowly dropping, but should be in good fishable shape this weekend.

If you’re not interested in Steelhead or you want to stay a little closer there should be plenty of fresh Coho in both the Sandy and the Clack and probably a few Steelhead as well. If you want to chase Trout this is the last weekend before the general trout season closes, and with that closure comes the end of Sea-Run Cutthroat fishing.

Whatever you decide to do this weekend get out there and make your own fishing report. 

Best, Worst Year Ever!

Info Fly fishing - Wednesday, October 18, 2017


Joel is out of town for the week chasing Trout in Montana and he left the inmates to run the asylum, meaning Josh and Nick are in charge. Since Joel’s out this week I (Josh) will be giving you the fishing debriefing. 

I don’t know if any of you have noticed, but fall is definitely here! October and November are two of my favorite fishing months. There are so many fishing opportunities it’s hard to know what to do. This time of year I personally am focusing on steelhead fishing east of the cascades, typically the Deschutes, Klickitat, Snake and Grande Ronde. 

Our scouts have been reporting back to us with success stories of Green Drakes on the Metolius, coho in the local rivers, Rob and the Water Time Outfitters crew have been having great success on the upper Deschutes for both trout and steelhead, and I just got a fresh report from Tracy that she finally landed he first Deschutes steelhead! Those are just a few of the reports that we have received. Don’t forget about lake fishing, steelhead in the far eastern corner out our state like the Grande Ronde steelhead, Clearwater, and Snake. Also at the end of this month a lot of fisheries will be closing down like Sea-run Cutthroat fishing on the coast and general trout fishing. So now’s the time to get your last casts in before they're gone till next year.

Now I’m sure that everyone has heard about the poor returns to the upper Columbia river basin this year and it’s probably even affected your fishing. This year there has been a lot of talk of how poor the returns are. The ten year average for steelhead passage over Bonneville Dam is around 330,000. This year we will be around 116,000. So yeah fifty percent of average is pretty bad. Now if we didn’t actually have dams in the river counting fish we wouldn’t know how bad the returns are and we would just go fishing anyway. This era of internet fishing reports has kind of made us less dedicated to fishing. One of the things that I am constantly telling people is to forget the fishing report and to go out and make their own.

Nick and I have been making a lot of fishing reports lately, honestly I’m surprised he puts up with me. We’re a pretty good combo, Nick eats tons of candy and sugary snacks and I yell at him to quit bouncing around like a Mexican Jumping Bean. 

The week before last we ran up from the mouth of the Deschutes with Tom Larimer and tested out a bunch of new G Loomis IMX Pro Short Speys. They are pretty amazing! If you haven’t touched or seen one, come by the shop. That day we touched a lot of fish but had a hard time sealing the deal. Sadly to say our landing ratio was low maybe 30%. 

This week Dave Hendrie joined our party and we headed east to the Klickitat. This was the first time all of us had fished together and I’m sure it won’t be our last. Part of the reason for that might be the great fishing we had or that we all get along really well. Anyway, did I mention that we had a great fishing this trip? Our landing ratio was much better, at 80%. Unfortunately, Nick is the reason we weren’t batting 1000 as he lost his only fish. Losing that fish didn’t phase him. It just gave him another excuse to eat some more candy and tie on a different fly. Nick is always in good spirits and makes fishing fun!

We did end up hooking fish with both floating lines and sink tips. We fished T-11 2.5Fx7.5S MOW tips and a new Scientific angler dual density tip that sinks a little slower. Both of those match up well with the OPST Commando heads. My typical fall setup is some sort of short 5 or 6 wt spey rod. I especially like the G Loomis NRX 12’6wt switch rod. I match it up with a Hardy Perfect Taupo and a 375gr OPST commando head. Whichever sink tip you like and you’re ready for anything. Our most productive fly was a Klamath Intruder. It didn’t really matter what color it was they all were working, but our favorites were the Pink, Red and orange, and black and blue.

Personally, I don’t specifically go fishing to catch fish, although that is important. I go for many reasons like my mental health and trying new tackle. Our fishing outings have not reflected the poor fish returns of the Columbia River. Honestly it’s been the best worst year I can remember. What we have noticed is that the rivers are less crowded and we are still catching fish.

REMEMBER NOT EVERYTHING YOU READ ON THE INTERNET IS TRUE. Take it with a grain of salt and discover for yourself what’s going on out there. I expect you to report back to me next week with stories of fishing success.

Puget Sound Sea-Run Cutthroat Adventure

Joel La Follette - Thursday, July 27, 2017
You'll want to clear off space in your 2018 calendar for the "Second Annual Puget Sound Sea-Run Adventure" because we had a blast! The sun, moon and stars all line up providing those adventurous folks that joined us with a very memorable weekend on the shores of Puget Sound.

Fish were caught, stories told and an abundance of memories made as the Royal Treatment crew and friends gathered at Manchester State Park in Washington. We couldn't have planned it any better if we tried or knew what we were doing. With absolutely wonderful weather, a beautiful campground and plenty of willing fish, this adventure was just about perfect. If there was a downside, it was that we had too much food!

Jake Zirkle, our G. Loomis rep, providing an awesome fajita lunch on Sunday that pretty much negated the need for dinner that evening. Nevertheless, our "Stone Soup Potluck" offered plenty of options for those who still had appetites after the sun went down.

Then there was the entertainment. Our own Nick Wheeler took up the challenge of dining on the most interesting combinations of roasted hotdog and toasted marshmallow creations imaginable. Who knew whipped cream was a hotdog condiment? I even toasted up a S'more or two.

We've set the dates, sign up for next year!















































Springers, Shad and an Island in the Sun

Joel La Follette - Thursday, June 15, 2017

While the consensus is that the Salmonfly hatch did not live up to it’s billing, not all was doom and gloom over on the Deschutes. Anglers plying the river in the later stages of this major emergence were rewarded with some memorable fish. The dandy Redside pictured above was captured by our youth ambassador Ian Wildermuth on a drift with Capt. Skittles. This image missed last week’s edition due to the overflow of Shadness.

The past weekend’s weather was fairly challenging with cooler temps and a bit of a breeze. Forecasts look better for the coming week after we get through this damp lead up to the weekend. Today the weather in Maupin is supposed to be cloudy and hovering around 71F. That sounds like a Mayfly kind of day to me.

I chatted with Brian Silvey Tuesday evening and he reported PMDs and Caddis were keeping things very interesting on the town run and the Pine Tree to Mack’s drift. Competition has been light since the Big Bugs bugged out, and he has been able to fish just about anywhere he’s wanted to. He even exercised a few fish on the lee side of Joel’s Island the other day with a couple friends of mine. Brian noted that the snack bar and t-shirt shop have not yet been rebuilt on the island since the winter high water, and he filed a formal complaint regarding the mooring facilities. Mr. Silvey has a few days available over the coming weeks and will include a personal tour of the island if requested. I’m graciously waiving all landing fees for the next three weeks, so give Brian a call.

Over on the Metolius, the whispered report is that Green Drakes are showing when conditions are right. This mystical hatch favors cloudy days, but in some cases will make an appearance when the sun drops behind the trees. Don’t pack up and head home too early. PMDs and the misc. small Mayfly hatch are adding to the menu.

Meanwhile, the Shad Madness continues with plenty of scales flying in the shadow of Willamette Falls. Grabs by Springers have been adding to the excitement of crashing waters and barking Sea lions. Shad fishing can be a full on sensory overload even on slow days. Add 30 to 50 hook-ups a day and soon you have a boatload of happy anglers.

Speaking of Springers, Steelhead swingers have been intercepting a few brutes as they cast, step, cast, down the Clackamas River. Cooler cloudy days are prefect for this past-time. Keep an eye pealed for a ponytailed bamboo caster teasing fish with skaters. He's fairly harmless, but his affliction is contagious. Stay back.

Springers and the Easter Bunny

Joel La Follette - Thursday, April 13, 2017

Springers have pulled much of the boat traffic off the local Steelhead streams and plopped them down in the Willamette River for the tourists to see. This is allowing for a little more room to swing a fly uninterrupted on the Clack and Sandy. The Clackamas kicked out some dandy fresh fish over the last few days, a mix of winter and summer returners. The river is currently in the best shape it’s been in all winter/spring. The Sandy is a touch on the low side, but could hold the fish of a lifetime if you bring your A game.

Winter fish will be doing the dance on spawning beds throughout the state so please do not disturb them. If you see fish hanging out over gravel, keep moving. Don’t be that guy.

The mighty D has dropped significantly and is currently rolling to the sea at about 8,680cfs on the Moody gauge. This might be the perfect weekend to dust off your Trout gear since much of the population will be chasing the Easter Bunny.

Don’t forget to register for the Oregon Trout Trail!

Spring Trout Rendezvous Report

Joel La Follette - Thursday, April 06, 2017


The first annual Royal Treatment Spring Trout Rendezvous is in the books and it was a rousing success. Close to 40 anglers joined us for a little river side fellowship this past Sunday on the banks of the raging Deschutes. While high water kept fishing opportunities limited, there was plenty of casting action and we even broke out the “Wader Up Challenge” adding to the entertainment factor. Representatives from Loomis, Sage, Winston and Echo rods were on hand with their latest offerings allowing all who wished to test drive a new rod the opportunity. While the Scott rep was tyed up, he did send us a few sticks to fish as well.




Then there was the food. Our “Stone Soup” potluck and Taco Bar made sure no one went home hungry. Planned or not, we had a south of the border theme with plenty of beef tacos, pork carnitas, chips, salsa and tubs of guacamole. Our buddy Brent went off menu with a pot of Cajun shrimp that tucked into a tortilla nicely and were delicious! 



When it came to dessert what happened on the Deschutes, stays on the Deschutes. I’ll just say there was plenty of tasty after Taco treats to cleanse the palate and add to the waistline. I didn’t even know there was such a thing as vegan cupcakes…


High water didn’t slow down the dedicated anglers who showed up to fish. After the Taco Bar closed, big nymphs and San Juan Worms wreaked havoc on the resident rainbows in the waters above White River. While the fish wouldn’t break any size records, they definitely helped chase away the cobwebs of winter. Kimi thought she was tied into a monster Trout when she scored this impressive bottom feeder. Our own Nick Wheeler did the netting and releasing honors. While it is the policy of this editorial staff to #keepemwet and not show fish out of water, this image needed to be shared. Please, #keepemwet. 






A special thanks goes out to factory reps Tom Larimer, Erik Johnson and Eric Neufeld for joining in on this inaugural event and sharing their expertise. I also need to send out a very big thank-you to my lovely wife, Kellie, and the best mother-in-law in the business, Sally Walker, for their hard work in pre-cooking, baking and organizing this picnic. Thanks to all who contributed and attended! We’re doing it again next year on April 1st. Mark your calendar!


The water is up, so what?

Joel La Follette - Thursday, March 30, 2017

Another downturn in river levels across the area jump started the spring Steelhead outlook this week instilling optimism in the dedicated practitioners of the sport. Coastal rivers were productive for the most part, but we did receive one report of a serious mudslide that caused some issues on the North Fork of the Nehalem. No additional information was received by this morning’s deadline.

The Sandy River has returned to perfect shape and shared the fine specimen shown above with our good friend, Joe. Brian Silvey provided the photo and guidance for this adventure. There is still time left to participate in this fishery, just call Brian or Marty.

Trout chasers are feeling the sting of a good old fashion spring run-off with high water dominating open Trout waters. Even the Metolius is not immune to this natural phenomena. Our favorite spring creek is running at twice its normal volume at present. Lake Creek is adding significant flows to the upper river as the snows of Suttle Lake melt away.

The Crooked River is at the mercy of dam operations as officials release water in anticipation of a full reservoir. At last check this normally docile stream was hustling downriver at 2760cfs. Perhaps just a bit much for successful angling.

The Deschutes is filling its banks as well, but not at the whim of dam operators. Natural runoff has it sprinting towards the Columbia at just a tick under 13,000 cfs on the Moody gauge. While high and off-color, there are still opportunities for the very optimistic. Fish in close and stay out of the water. Big Stones and San Juan Worms are an old-timers trick for high and muddy water, so is taking photos of wildlife and going for a hike. Be smart, be careful.




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