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Camp Water

Camp water is close to home. Here you will find information on stuff happening here in the shop and on our local waters. You'll also find our weekly newsletter feature, Trailer Trash Thursday, a fun collection of fly fishing videos, perfect for a midweek distraction. If you don't get the newsletter, be sure to sign up today!

Trailer Trash Thursday Lego Edition

Joel La Follette - Thursday, May 25, 2017
Marty Sheppard of Little Creek Outfitters bring us this week's TTT action film.


Fishing with Little Creek Outfitters; A Lego Stop motion from marty sheppard on Vimeo.

A Plea for Trout

Joel La Follette - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Transcribed from The Dalles Daily Chronicle, January 13th, 1893

THE DALLES, OREGON

A PLEA FOR TROUT
It Is Necessary for Us to Read the Fish Commission the Riot Act About Black Bass.

It is proposed sometime soon to send out another carload of Bass from eastern waters by the United States fish commission to stock the lakes and streams of Oregon and Washington. Our mountain trout has been the divinity of anglers in Oregon streams for time immemorial, and there is a wholesome objection raised to the proposal of the United States fish commission in its efforts of supplanting them with bass from anywhere.

Judges, presidents, senators and plebeians, who have gone many miles to toss the gamy speckled trout a fly will ask the press of this coast to enter a protest against this proposed desecration, which is a worse one than the infliction visited upon our “preserves” by the introduction of carp and bull-pouts.

Our mountain trout is the acknowledged king of all fresh water fishes. No other will take the fly like him or compare in gaminess; nor is there any so toothsome. The black bass is a very good fish compared with the bull-pout and sunfish, but he is hot in the same category with the trout.

As food the black bass brings eighteen cents a pound in the New York market today, where the trout sells for a dollar a pound. There is a corresponding difference in their game qualities. The bass is not the superior of our trout, in size even. Any one who has ever caught either the large bass, or the small-mouthed bass, in eastern waters, where the fishing is considered good, will tell you, if they ever had the experience, that they, never had so much sport in a whole day, as they found in Trout lake, or any one of the hundred trout streams in the vicinity of The Dalles in half an hour.

This is not the climate, either, for bass, under the most favorable circumstances, and he would never flourish here. He is no comparison to the trout in any sense, and our Rod and Gun clubs should teach the fish commission that their labors in this behalf would never be appreciated.

Our fish is a true trout, though differing slightly from the eastern brook trout, and being a purely Pacific coast product, it should be our pride and ambition to keep him at his best. Then we may treat out eastern visitors to sport such as they can only read about at home. Nothing less than the speckled beauties we have is good enough for the waters of our magnificent regions. Let us put a stop to the fishing out of season, slaughtering trout with giant powder and set-lines, and the Inland Empire will long remain a spot tor anglers to dream of.

Trailer Trash Thursday Coastal Vibes Edition

Joel La Follette - Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Fish are simply found in beautiful places.... 

Coastal Vibes from Ocean & Land on Vimeo.

What About Salmon Protection?

Joel La Follette - Saturday, May 13, 2017
What about salmon protection?

That the food fish of our state need better protection that is now afforded his agreed.
You have already or doubtless will received considerable literature on the subject, but no matter how attractive the argument, stop and consider how much it may be colored by self interest.

The United States Bureau of Fisheries are the greatest expert authorities on the subject and have no ax to grind. Read what they say.

Department of Commerce and Labor
Office of the Secretary, Washington DC
Hon. Charles W Fulton

Sir: The Department realizes the importance of various questions affecting the salmon fishery in the Columbia River brought up in your letter of the 18th ultimo, and has taken this opportunity to make a thorough investigation of the matter. There can be no question that the status of the fishery is unsatisfactory, and that under existing conditions the trend may be steadily downward, with the result that in a comparatively few years the run of salmon will be reduced to such degree that thousands of fishermen maybe thrown out of employment and much capital rendered idle.

The federal government is without any jurisdiction whatsoever in the premises, and the duty of conserving the salmon supply in the Columbia devolves on the states of Oregon, Washington and Idaho; but this department has been charged by Congress with the important fish culture operations in the Columbia basin, and has felt compelled from time to time to direct attention to the necessity for giving adequate protection to the various species of salmon frequenting that stream.

The department is convinced that the run of salmon in the Columbia can be amply maintained for an indefinite period if artificial propagation is supplemented by rational protection; but artificial propagation alone cannot cope with the situation, and, as a matter of fact, the recent experience of the department has shown that its benefit labors are rendered almost futile by the failure of the states to appreciate this fact.

The department sees no reason for the elimination of fish wheels from the river as there is no evidence to show that this form of apparatus is particularly destructive to salmon. The condition that is especially favorable for the passage of salmon, namely very high water, renders the wheels unserviceable and, on the other hand, periods of very low water, are also unfavorable for the wheels. During the past two or three seasons the catch of salmon by wheels has been comparatively small; but even if it were very large it would be a fact of no special significance in the present connection.

The Columbia River is, however, made to yield a quantity of salmon far greater than regard for the future supply permits, and the drain is yearly becoming more serious. No one familiar with the situation can fail to appreciate the menace to the perpetuity of the industry that is furnished by the concentration of a tremendous amount of fixed and floating apparatus of capture in or near the mouth of the river.

This apparatus comprises about 400 pound nets or traps, over 80 long-sweep seines, and more than 2200 gill nets, the last having an aggregate approximate link over 570 miles; and these appliances capture more than 95% of the fish taken in Oregon and Washington waters of the river, the figures for 1904 being nearly 34,000,000 pounds, or 98.7 percent of the total yield. Under such conditions, it is self evident that but comparatively few fish are permitted to reach the upper waters where the spawning grounds are located.

The details of the measures necessary to place to save an industry of the Columbia River on a permanent basis cannot be elaborated by the department at this time, but in general it may be said there should be (1) a restriction on the amount of apparatus employed in a given section; (2) an adequate, weekly closed season covering possibly two days at first, the reduced later if the circumstances warrant it; (3) an annual closed season, preferably at the beginning of the salmon run, and (4) joint arrangement between the states, so that protective measures can be harmonious.


Respectfully, Oscar S Straus
Secretary

Oscar Solomon Straus (December 23, 1850 – May 3, 1926) was United States Secretary of Commerce and Labor under President Theodore Roosevelt from 1906 to 1909. Straus was the first Jewish United States Cabinet Secretary.

I came across this article in the Madras paper while doing research on another project and thought I'd share this perspective from 1908. 

Trailer Trash Thursday The Stones Edition

Joel La Follette - Thursday, May 11, 2017

This is kind of a throw-back Thursday as we revisit a short film that came out over 4 years ago. The Outside Bend Productions crew has evidently had to get real jobs as we haven't seen much from them in awhile. That's really too bad as they do good work and even took home a Trashy Award a few years back. 


the stone sessions vol. II: expectations from Outside Bend Productions on Vimeo.

Winston Bamboo Rod Shop Destroyed

Joel La Follette - Tuesday, May 09, 2017
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Montana Standard Photo
Winston Rod Company Press Release
The R.L. Winston Rod Company suffered a great loss in history, tradition and the best bamboo rods on the market on Sunday morning, when the Winston Bamboo shop caught fire. It is suspected the fire resulted in a total loss of property and equipment, valued at over $1 million. Fortunately, no one was harmed and no damage to surrounding property occurred.

The fire took place exclusively at Winston's Bamboo shop. Our Boron/Graphite facility and Bauer Fly Reel operations run separately and business hours have not been affected.

More than the money, the fire feels like the passing of a cherished family member. Countless hours through many hands have shaped the fine bamboo rods that have passed through the now charred doors. It is not surprising the emotion Winston rods is feeling, and the healing process will take time. But, as we grieve, we also look to the future.

The R.L. Winston Rod Company has been in business for almost 90 years. A fire will not impede that history and continued growth, as we move forward. Every situation has two sides. We will choose to look at this as an opportunity and continue our passionate drive toward the future. Winston will be rebuilding the facility over the coming months and we hope to have operations running by the end of the year. It wont be easy, but this fire represents a great opportunity to reinforce our time-honored traditions and get back to our storied roots.

To our customers, we apologize for any inconvenience, but know that by 2018 we will be back up and running stronger than ever. Don't hesitate to place your orders now, knowing that the same quality with a heightened sense of place will be available again soon. We hope that you will follow us through this journey as we build the next chapter of the company's history!

Thank you for the initial out pouring of condolences and support! For more information please contact us, at info@winstonrods.com or by phone at 406.684.5674.

Trailer Trash Thursday Hole in the Ground Edition

Joel La Follette - Wednesday, May 03, 2017

Sometimes that extra mile is straight down a hole...


The Extra Mile | EPISODE 1: HOLE IN THE EARTH from Freeflow Motionworks on Vimeo.

What is Black Spot?

Joel La Follette - Wednesday, May 03, 2017

This photo of a Deschutes Bull Trout infected with Black Spot was taken by Nick Wheeler on May 1st on the Warm Springs to Trout Creek section of the Deschutes. 

A few weeks ago I mentioned that a parasite that infects salmonids was becoming more prevalent in the Deschutes with many anglers reporting catches infected with the telltale “black spots.” To answer some the questions floating around I turned to biologist Greg McMillan and asked “Just what is Black Spot and why are we seeing an increase in cases in the Deschutes?”

Greg responded, "Black spot disease is caused by a flatworm (trematode) parasite known in the scientific community as Uvulifer ambloplitis, and also known as “neascus”.  This parasite has a complicated life cycle that starts with eggs in water, which hatch and become juveniles known as miracidia, which in turn infect aquatic snails.  In snails this form of the parasite matures into the next life form, known as cercariae.  Cercariae are shed by the snails and become free swimmers, which attach to fish.  Once the cercariae have attached to the flesh of fish, the fish develops an immune response that causes the dark spot.

Kingfishers are the next host, which become infected when they ingest infected fish.  The cercariae develop into adult flatworms.  The parasite then produces eggs, which are shed in feces by kingfishers, and deposited in water where the life cycle is reinitiated.

These flatworms do not appear to be fatal to fish, or other hosts.  There are scattered reports of fish stressed from other sources dying while infected.  No human infections have been reported, but there is no real surveillance mechanism to detect human infections.  Although probably safe for human consumption after thorough cooking, there is no study data to confirm that.

None of us who have fished the lower Deschutes River for decades can say that we’ve seen many, if any fish with this condition until a year ago.  There are reports indicating there have been infected fish in the lower Deschutes River and tributaries in the past, but they aren’t common.  So what has changed?  Is this random?  Or linked to the ongoing ecological changes we are all seeing in the lower river?

This might be related to an increase in the snail population in the lower Deschutes River. Portland General Electric’s Year 1 Data Summary Report from their Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Report Study published in 2014, indicates that there has been a significant increase in snail populations in the lower Deschutes River.  This increase in population in the intermediate host (snails) might be related to the increase in black spot disease noted in fish.  The snail population increase is likely linked to the increase in algae in the lower river.

Is this a catastrophic occurrence?  Probably not, but it could be another indication of ecological change in the lower Deschutes River."

As Greg said, Black Spot is probably not catastrophic, but it is of concern. Finding out more information on the disease occurrence in Oregon is hard as it seems to not be of concern to ODFW at this time. Perhaps if more cases are reported by anglers, ODFW will finally take notice and look into the cause of this increase in cases. 

I would suggest that anglers fishing the Deschutes carefully photograph and report cases of Black Spot to ODFW. Take note of where the catch was made and how many cases were observed. Please make an effort to leave fish in the water when handling and photographing them. If you send a photo of infected fish to me I'll add it to this blog post. Again, please handle all wild fish with respect and care.

Trailer Trash Thursday High Country Cutthroat Edition

Joel La Follette - Thursday, April 27, 2017

This came across my Instafacesnaptweet feed this morning and the beautiful images captured me. Makes me want to get out and explore small creeks with my camera....


Trailer Trash Thursday You Got'a be Nuts Edition

Joel La Follette - Thursday, April 20, 2017

So, you think winter Steelheaders are nuts....




Strippin' for 20's from Garrett Perdick on Vimeo.


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